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I could have saved this fly.
Here begins a new series of creatures I inadvertently kill…

I could have saved this fly.

Here begins a new series of creatures I inadvertently kill…

New work… “Old age is not for sissies: Grandfather series”

Two photographs (On Vacation 1 and 2) were selected for this exhibition.  The opening is March 15 in Ruston, LA!

Two photographs (On Vacation 1 and 2) were selected for this exhibition.  The opening is March 15 in Ruston, LA!

The New Normal


Sweetcake Enso

Photographs published here

Press from Southern Open

Daily Visionary Post #56:

Enter the Southern Open 2010 exhibition at the Acadiana Center for the Arts. Turn Left. Walk to the far side of the wall directly opposite the entrance. You will be confronted with four photographs of some particularly bizarre homemade towers composed of products and objects - glass jars of seasoning, cleaning products, aluminum foil, cups, tins filled with greasy salves, collanders, and pots. They are visual testaments to a life spent collecting and using things. Artist Ariya Martin saw fit to use some of the things she has collected in her life to make “teeny tiny towers” and document her efforts. Why did she do this? Why not? After all, as adults, these products and objects become the building blocks of our lives - the things we use to achieve certain ends. There is a sense of play and discovery in the photographs. Some of the towers seem outlandishly preposterous and precarious, as if all the viewer had to do was blow on them, and the tower would collapse. There is a sense of goofy achievement evident in these works, as if a five year old was showing off, tugging at mommy’s skirt and saying “Look what I did!” However, there is also a sadness I feel about these pieces. They remind me of the Leaning Tower of Pisa, only I would call these the Leaning Towers of Pizza Hut. A long time ago, it used to be that the things we humans owned were OF us, typically made BY us or at the least made by someone we knew. There was value in that, and these things were much less disposable or replaceable because of that. Today, practically everything in our homes was probably made in a factory far away by someone we don’t even know. We gain convenience in this exchange, but we lose something also. In this way we devalue our surroundings and thereby ourselves. We build our lives from and fill or lives with cheapness. This is the font from which flows the river of Abjection in art. Why look at a Renaissance tower when a tower of hair sculpting gel and windex says so much more about our lives today? Why indeed.


                                                  - Reggie Michael Rodrigue

Acadiana Center for the Arts, http://acadianacenterforthearts.org/Exhibitions/Main-Gallery-May-8—-July-24-2010
Towers #1-4
archival pigment print, 34”x22”

Acadiana Center for the Arts, http://acadianacenterforthearts.org/Exhibitions/Main-Gallery-May-8—-July-24-2010

Towers #1-4

archival pigment print, 34”x22”

Arthouse Coop

Work included in exhibition, The Space Between.

Photos from the show at the Brooklyn Art Library here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/arthousecoop/sets/72157623822829873/

I could have saved this fly.
Here begins a new series of creatures I inadvertently kill…

I could have saved this fly.

Here begins a new series of creatures I inadvertently kill…

New work… “Old age is not for sissies: Grandfather series”

Two photographs (On Vacation 1 and 2) were selected for this exhibition.  The opening is March 15 in Ruston, LA!

Two photographs (On Vacation 1 and 2) were selected for this exhibition.  The opening is March 15 in Ruston, LA!

The New Normal


Sweetcake Enso

Photographs published here

Press from Southern Open

Daily Visionary Post #56:

Enter the Southern Open 2010 exhibition at the Acadiana Center for the Arts. Turn Left. Walk to the far side of the wall directly opposite the entrance. You will be confronted with four photographs of some particularly bizarre homemade towers composed of products and objects - glass jars of seasoning, cleaning products, aluminum foil, cups, tins filled with greasy salves, collanders, and pots. They are visual testaments to a life spent collecting and using things. Artist Ariya Martin saw fit to use some of the things she has collected in her life to make “teeny tiny towers” and document her efforts. Why did she do this? Why not? After all, as adults, these products and objects become the building blocks of our lives - the things we use to achieve certain ends. There is a sense of play and discovery in the photographs. Some of the towers seem outlandishly preposterous and precarious, as if all the viewer had to do was blow on them, and the tower would collapse. There is a sense of goofy achievement evident in these works, as if a five year old was showing off, tugging at mommy’s skirt and saying “Look what I did!” However, there is also a sadness I feel about these pieces. They remind me of the Leaning Tower of Pisa, only I would call these the Leaning Towers of Pizza Hut. A long time ago, it used to be that the things we humans owned were OF us, typically made BY us or at the least made by someone we knew. There was value in that, and these things were much less disposable or replaceable because of that. Today, practically everything in our homes was probably made in a factory far away by someone we don’t even know. We gain convenience in this exchange, but we lose something also. In this way we devalue our surroundings and thereby ourselves. We build our lives from and fill or lives with cheapness. This is the font from which flows the river of Abjection in art. Why look at a Renaissance tower when a tower of hair sculpting gel and windex says so much more about our lives today? Why indeed.


                                                  - Reggie Michael Rodrigue

Acadiana Center for the Arts, http://acadianacenterforthearts.org/Exhibitions/Main-Gallery-May-8—-July-24-2010
Towers #1-4
archival pigment print, 34”x22”

Acadiana Center for the Arts, http://acadianacenterforthearts.org/Exhibitions/Main-Gallery-May-8—-July-24-2010

Towers #1-4

archival pigment print, 34”x22”

Arthouse Coop

Work included in exhibition, The Space Between.

Photos from the show at the Brooklyn Art Library here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/arthousecoop/sets/72157623822829873/

Press from Southern Open
Arthouse Coop

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